BA: APP

Evaluation.

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Throughout this project, I have enabled myself to explore deeper into how design can be even more effective than how it previously was. My project was basing the idea of how A Short Story can tell so much inside one person, let alone hundreds of thousands.

I got my original idea after looking at inspiration from paper cut outs. The stories that were told using imagery inspired me to want to try and present the same idea but told in a different perspective. The Who Am I? exhibition at the Science Museum influenced me to want to show people the possibilities of what it contains, giving my idea a purpose.

My overall idea was to create a detailed cut out piece to show what goes on inside someone’s head, similar to how the exhibition looks into everyone as an individual. By doing a poster in the format of a paper cut out gave it some form of individuality to the person creating the poster (AKA myself) and gives the advertising of the exhibition a fresh appearance in comparison to the older styles.

I wanted to incorporate a magazine article to further show development for the exhibition advertisement. Choosing New Scientist helped me to link all of my work together, and to explain about the exhibition in a more descriptive way, other than just the advertisement.

I felt my project throughout showed the theme clearly through the poster, article and the mock-ups, showing what goes on inside someone’s head. I was happy with how I continued to push my work further through the feedback of considering those with visual impairments. Considering those with visual impairments, such as colour blindness, had helped me to ensure that my design is accessible to as many people as possible, knowing that the exhibition is a public exhibition for everyone of all ages and abilities to access.

If I was to have more time doing this poster, I would have liked to produce a series to show put up for the advertisement. I would have liked to do multiple people to see what went on inside their head specifically, creating an individual identification for each individual to further show how everyone is different but connected.

Overall, I really enjoyed the project. The most challenging part was ensuring that the cut outs were done correctly and efficiently, however the poster overall executed well, alongside with producing the mock-ups to show how the poster would alternatively look on different banners and templates, but also in the magazine article of New Scientist.

Mock ups.

Inside Gallery

Inside Gallery

mock-up-5

mock-up-4

mock-up-3

mock-up-2

mock-up-1I thought it would be a good idea to do a few mock-ups for my poster to see how it would look in some common places of where it might be placed. I also had a quick go at seeing how it would look on the banners that are outside the museums on a thinner strip.

To make this work, I just used a different picture and altered the text to fit with the style of the banner, which I thought worked really well. With my poster, I can see that it has the ability to be flexible with how it can be presented to suit all different sizes of advertisement banners and signs, making it ultimately a much more effective piece.

Making my advertisement poster.

Being aware of the feedback I got, as well as making sure that I have thoroughly considered all of the specifications, I took a lot of time making sure that the poster was as good quality as I could get it.

I first played around with the Science Museum logo to try and see where it would look good across the A1 sheet, aware that it might be going over my work, as well as considering that I would need to put other pieces of text over it.

I experimented a lot with the tones, however I concluded it was better to keep it simple, because the poster itself has a lot going on being a photo, as well as having a detailed cut out piece.

After I found a suitable place for the logo, I wanted to make sure that the Who am I? title would stand out more against the logo, but show that they are both connected. Using the same yellow tone that I had used for the background of my paper cut out, I put the title as that one also to try and connect the text with the image a little more.

I then played around with where I could put the body of information on the page, as well as adding a little bit of bevel shadow on the title to separate it slightly from the Science Museum logo. I thought this worked really well because of the bevel and shadows that I had created from the layers in the paper cut out backgrounds.

Aware of the colours that I had previously discussed, I wanted to make sure that the blue of the Science Museum logo against the pink ‘head’ was easy enough to distinguish against each other.

Turning my monitor to greyscale every time I played around with the colours really helped me to understand how the hues could be similar / different from each other. By doing this, I was able to find colours that complimented each other, but also had enough contrast against each other that they would not clash next to each other.

I wanted to keep taking it further with the consideration of those who may not see my poster very clearly, so I changed the view of the tones to different settings that people may find hard to see.

For example, on the red tone, I turned down the saturation completely to make sure that they could still see the information, and more importantly, see the story in the head clearly enough to make out what everything is showing. 

Final image

Final image

After I was satisfied with the colours, I tweaked the text slightly to make sure that it was not too scattered on the page, but it was also not contrasting too much against the rest of the poster, yet the focus was still on the head.

I found this the trickiest part, because I did not want the text to override the image, however I feel I kept the balance of text and imagery, especially considering that I had put text over the image itself.

Refining my article.

I kept on experimenting with my article to find out what looked better for the whole format of the magazine article. After playing around with the pictures, I decided to use my advertisement image as the main picture, and have a separate image beside the text to show a smaller section of the cut out in more detail.

Version: 7 Final version

Version: 7
Final version

I wanted to include a more detailed image in the article, because some parts of the cut out may be harder to see for some by looking at the advertisement alone. By enlarging a smaller area with greater detail, the audience would be able to see the attention to detail that I put in for the image.

By including the advertisement poster as the main picture, it shows a good link between the article and the advertisements that I will be producing as mock ups also.

Version: 8 5% Yellow

Version: 8
5% Yellow

I wanted to make sure that my layout was as similar to the actual magazine as possible, so after doing a test print, I could see that the paper would need to have more yellow (5%) in to match the colour of the paper. Because the paper quality itself is coloured this, I will need to try and make it as similar to the colour as I can.

Tone: C 11% M 8% Y 11% K 0%

Tone:
C 11%
M 8%
Y 11%
K 0%

Tone-matching from magazine paper

Tone-matching from magazine paper

Version: 9 C 11% M 8% Y 11% K 0%

Version: 9
C 11%
M 8%
Y 11%
K 0%

I thought this looked too yellow, so I took the tone of the paper from a picture I took and got a more grey-like tone for it. What I intend to do is do a few test prints to see how each one looks, to try and get the tones as close to the real one as possible.

Capital 'words' similarity

Capital ‘words’ similarity

Capital 'words' similarity

Capital ‘words’ similarity

Drop cap similarity Paper needs a yellow tone

Drop cap similarity
Paper needs a yellow tone

I also made sure that I paid close attention to the details of the magazine to my article, such as making sure the first word began with capitals, which is what the magazine have also done throughout.

So far, I’m very happy with my result. To take it a little bit further however, I decided to try and colour match the article as close to the colour of the magazine paper itself. Here were my results:

C - 3 Y - 3 M - 7 K - 0

C – 3
Y – 3
M – 7
K – 0

C - 6 Y - 4 M - 11 K - 0

C – 6
Y – 4
M – 11
K – 0

C - 7 Y - 7 M - 11 K - 0 CLOSEST COLOUR MATCH

C – 7
Y – 7
M – 11
K – 0
CLOSEST COLOUR MATCH

C - 8 Y - 8 M - 11 K - 0

C – 8
Y – 8
M – 11
K – 0

C - 9 Y - 9 M - 10 K - 0

C – 9
Y – 9
M – 10
K – 0

By doing the test prints, I was able to experiment and make sure that my magazine article looked as similar as the magazine as I could get it. I was surprised that the third one appeared to be the closest colour match, because of the difference it had looked on screen in comparison to the difference it looked on print.

Final article embedded into the magazine

Final article embedded into the magazine

Designing my article.

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Taking inspiration from the article I have selected for the layout of my article, I decided to keep the layout to having 3 grids, using Georgia and Helvetica Light as complimentary fonts also. By keeping it to this structure, it does not look out of place against the rest of the layout of the magazine, but instead flows with the rest of the magazine. I also included a mock up picture to ensure that the layout looks how I have envisioned it to look when designing it.

I experimented with the paragraphs, trying out with gaps, without gaps, as well as the font size. I wanted to pay close attention to the detail in comparison with the other articles in the magazine. I noticed that they kept the first word in the article in capitals next to the drop cap, which I have also decided to replicate. Similarly, I kept the layout similar to the rest of the magazine structure, as I felt this was the best way of presenting it, so it does not stand out too far against the rest of the magazine.

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I’m happy with the result of my article. I feel that it flows nicely in the rest of the magazine, as well as linking well to the image presented. The link in the article and the link with the picture go well against each other; the article explains the background of the image, and the image shows the example of what’s new in the exhibition.

I wasn’t completely satisfied with my font choice, so I researched what font New Scientist had used (The Antiqua Basic), and I got the closet one equivalent: Tele-Antiqua. Similarly, the title used Neo Sans STD, which is what I have found a font similar to this: Titillium Web. Putting my final images into the article, I felt that they all worked well with the article.

My personal favourites were these three. What I liked about the image with myself holding it, is that it shows more meaning into the picture, knowing that the person who’s ‘head’ it is, is holding their own.

Similarly, I thought the other image was equally striking. I thought the border of the background worked well with the image, as it helped to break up the image slightly to allow more room and focus on the center of that page, but also allow the audience to read the article easily without too many distractions opposite the page.

Lastly, the image that has no border I felt gave a good contrast between the colours and the separation of the image from the rest of the magazine.

I wanted to make sure I was considering my audience carefully after the feedback. Knowing that people of various visual impairments would see my poster, I wanted to make sure that people who are colour blind could still see the image.

What I had decided to do, is greyscale the pictures; the main ones, and the articles. By turning it greyscale, it shows how similar the hues are from each other. From turning it greyscale, I can see that the image is still clear to see, as well as the colours in the article. Considering the majority of the target audience means that my design is tailored to more people, and therefore would make it a more effective design, knowing that the majority can see it visually and clearly.

By making sure that the audience can see the story, it adds more meaning to the picture, drawing people in to want to look at it, which would also encourage people to visit the exhibition to find out what else they have introduced that is bigger, better and even more different than before; aiming at more people individually, like my cut out piece.

Option 1

Option 1

Option 2

Option 2

Option 3

Option 3

Final pictures.

1

1

2

2

3

3

4

4

5

5

6

6

7

7

After taking my pictures, I had a look at what ones I felt would be best suited for my advertisement, article and mock-ups. I narrowed my images down to 7, which were all produced in RAW format, which I found gave my images a far better and more accurate quality of colour in the picture.

The compositions of my images are presented so that I can be flexible if I wanted to have a border around it, or leave it how it is. Because there will be text going over the top, I will need to think about how I will position the text to allow the top part of the image to still be the main focus, but also show enough information to what the poster is displaying.

Making my final piece.

To begin with my cut out, I got the outlines of every layer printed. I used a scalpel knife for the whole process, starting off with cutting out the silhouette of my head. I then began working on the brain, using a trace, which I had put on top of the card. By doing it this way, the scalpel would have dented the card already as I was going over it, which meant that I could carve out the objects more accurately after with a spotlight.

It was really difficult cutting out the piece, ensuring that no pieces had drastically been ruined. Carefully I carved out my segments, which took me about two weeks to do. Once I had everything carved out, I began to consider the colours I was going to use.

Following from the feedback I had got, I decided to go for a dark background, playing around with the sizes and composition. I ended up going with the background the covered the whole silhouette, because it then retained the focus on the head. I mounted the layers using clear foam stickers, so that they did not look too visible if I picture was to be hung up.

After experimenting with the colours, I had decided that all of the yellow took out some of the detail from the whole of the brain. Because the whole image is a symbol of what someone thinks, I thought it would also make the audience think that some people are always looking on the ‘bright side’, which in reality people do not. I wanted to still incorporate some colour variant, so I opted for a dark grey to bevel behind some of the segments of the brain, but also cut out bits of yellow to put on front also on some areas.

I thought I needed to bring some of the attention to detail out even further, so I layered the grey behind the owl so the detail was more visible behind the yellow, and I also made the stars yellow to show the brighter colour trickling through the brain, instead of having the colours too separately apart.

I thought this represented a much more accurate description of what goes on inside someone’s head; knowing that people think differently about things at different times, as well as understanding that some people have a more positive outlook on things than others.

Overall, I’m happy with how my final piece has come out with so far. My next step is to take pictures of the final piece hung up to then be presented onto a poster, as well as mocking it up in the article.

Pecha Kucha feedback.

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Following from the presentation I had to deliver to show how I was getting on, I found I still had a lot of improvements to make on my final result. What I benefitted however, was getting it clear that my final outcome will be a poster of the cut out as well as showcasing it in the article, which would be followed by concepts of the poster on banners, bus stop signs and a mock up of it in the exhibition itself.

The first bit of feedback was on the colour scheme of the poster. The pink worked fine, however the contrast of the blue made it slightly hard to see for those who are colour blind.

This is something that I had researched on for my dissertation, about how graphic design has adapted to those with visual impairments, and with this in mind, I would need to find colours that contrast yet compliment each other more.

In response to this, I went onto Colour Adobe and typed in the colour pink I was using in Photoshop (#AE4B9C) to see what colours were complimentary to this. My personal opinion was that the shades would look too harsh as a background for the piece.

Because of this, I would need to think of a new solution. My approach was to think of a darker background such as charcoal (#36454F), which I think would work really well instead.

I had thought about adding in the extra cut out at the bottom of the page. I included a quick mock up of the title ‘lets get personal’, but felt this was unnecessary and that it would lose focus on the top half of the page.

Brown from pink palette

Brown from pink palette

Yellow

Yellow

Orange

Orange

Taking it further, I noticed that the orange/yellow colour worked with the charcoal colour. I had a go to see how this would look in replacement with the white behind the cut out.

I tried out using two of the complimentary colours from charcoal, however I felt that both did not mix well with the pink. Looking back at the yellow (#E88B0C)/brown (#AE7A4B)/orange (#E88B0C) shades from the pink and charcoal, I thought a mustard-yellow (#FFE761) would be a good compromise between each of the shades.

Mustard Yellow

Mustard Yellow

Grayscale

Grayscale

I felt the mustard yellow worked really well for the poster, even trying it in grayscale showed that there was enough contrast in the colours so that each part was easily recognised, as well as the cut out being the primary focus of the page.

Referring my project back to my dissertation has helped to drive me to make these decisions more efficiently and carefully, knowing that my poster would need to be accessible to all of the audience other than just one target group.

White

White

I decided to see how the image would look if it was just in charcoal, pink and white, however I felt the contrast between the colours with the yellow stood out more and made the image look more colourful.

I felt this was also a good indication to show the personality of the person, considering that the head is telling a story, and the vibrant contrasting colours of the pink and yellow also signifies that person being vibrant, but also possibly dark and mysterious in the background.

The last bit of feedback was generally to play around with the type more, which I had intended to do once I had got my picture photographed and properly mocked up. I thought perhaps having a border around the image to separate the text from the image could be a possibility for my poster, which therefore makes it easy to adapt for other poster concepts, as well as for the image of my article.

https://color.adobe.com/create/color-wheel/?base=2&rule=Analogous&selected=0&name=My%20Color%20Theme&mode=rgb&rgbvalues=0.6823529411764706,0.4794117647059786,0.29411764705882354,0.91,0.25180113636374357,0.04550000000000004,1,0,0,0.6823529411764706,0.29411764705882354,0.611764705882353,0.275773780586589,0.21176470588235294,0.30980392156862746&swatchOrder=0,1,2,3,4

Article for New Scientist.

Who am I? Reappears.

It has been almost 7 years since the event of the Science Museum’s Who am I? exhibition has been running, questioning one’s thoughts about what they are as a person, and how you come to the understanding of your personal development.

The show has enabled you to explore your body, brain and how your genes work. People are able to find out more about themselves than they have ever done before, without going into a lab!

Today, Who am I? has been modified and developed to showcase how far science has come in the last 7 years since the exhibition began, but this time it explores deeper into your thoughts, and what you think of is how you are as a person that others may not have realised.

According to Bethany Brookshire, writer in the Science News, discusses how our brain fuels stress due to uncertainty, claiming that the ‘uncertainty we can’t do anything about is more stressful than the one we can.

The results help show exactly what in our lives freaks us out – and why.’ This thought travels around the exhibition, the question of why and the uncertainty of anything besides what our mind is telling us.

Of course, there is much more to the exhibition than you walking around questioning your own thoughts, it is able to tell you what you think about, why you think about those things, and what importance does it have to you.

You cannot help but wonder what else you may not know about yourself, but you also find out what it is about someone else that possibly made them fear something you may not have previously understood.

The exhibition leaves you with more questions than you came with, but it leaves you with far more answers than you would have realised.

Claus Lamm mentioned how our brain “prepares us to deal with environmental challenges”, however the unpredictability is what gets our brains ticking. The feeling of unpredictability that channels in your mind is what creates stress, which is how we become who we are as a person.

Are we ever able to have private thoughts again? The amazement of being able to figure out who someone is purely by visual communication is what makes this exhibition something completely out of the ordinary.

Science has come to not only create robots with human manners, but to create and solve areas of the mind we are ever finding out about. Once you think you have closed one door, a dozen others are opened for you to explore.

https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/scicurious/uncertainty-stressful-not-always-bad-thing

Mock up of my final poster.

Before I do the article for my final piece, I need to complete my picture. To make sure that everything looks the way I am intending it to, is I did a quick mock up digitally using a silhouette from Google. I then also used the Science Museum logo to see how it might possibly look.

I decided to colour it also using the colours that I have for my card, to ensure that the colours work well with the cut out. I was really happy with the result, so I decided to do it again using my own silhouette. What I have decided to do, is render the Who am I? in illustrator to make sure it is not blurry on the poster. I am deciding to do the text digitally after I have completed the picture. I thought this would still work really well considering.

I then changed the cut out to white. I thought this worked a lot better than the blue. What I thought I could do, is use the white card and underlay it from the purple, so that the white comes through instead of the blue on the cut out, to make it stand out more.

I had a look at it on its own as a paper cut, and I felt I it was missing something slightly at the bottom. I thought about putting an additional layer of text relating to the whole topic of what I am talking about. I thought about putting a quote of ‘lets get personal’ at the bottom.

 I first experimented with an existing image on the bottom and put a circle over the image so there wasn’t a clash with the text and image. I thought that this did work really well as it allowed me to be able to add text onto the image without feeling I have to crop / cut anything I don’t want to.